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asperger's syndrome information and features

         

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Why is there a presumption of inferiority? Why are we seen as bad and everyone else seen as good? Some of the language used by professionals to describe us betrays their ignorance and prejudice... despite all the evidence to the contrary some of them still insist we are incapable of speaking for ourselves, incapable of feeling or emotion, and incapable of contributing anything to society.

Having Asperger's syndrome does not mean that you are sick or unhealthy. You can have a perfectly fit and healthy body, live a full and happy life as long as anybody else's, and have a perfectly able mind, often with above average intelligence, be a good and moral person, and have various, skills, gifts, and benefits, not just as a result of thinking in a less common way, but just as anybody can.

The word disability is used to describe such a diverse collection of minorities. It has become like societies cupboard under the stairs where it hides away all the inconvenient minority groups. By creating one big homogeneous group of people, whose only real thing in common is the majorities refusal to accommodate them and adjust to meet their requirements, they can pass them off under this pseudo-medical concept of people who 'don't function properly' just because they don't function like the majority.

People say that in the world of the blind the one eyed man is king, but I think they are mistaken. In the world of the blind the one eyed man would be a freak, and his eye might even disable rather than enable him. Eyes are wonderful things to be sure, but they are only useful in a society that is designed around them. In the same way, the current conventions of social communication are only useful in a society that is designed around them... if they were in the minority how would they function in our world? All their so called skills would be disabilities... they would have no more success being like us than we do being like them.

Asperger's syndrome is a disability because we do not think and behave and function like the majority of people. We have numerous and diverse difficulties, but by far our largest obstacle to overcome is other people's prejudices, demands, and expectations. People who want us to be something we are not, and talk and behave in ways that they think are 'normal' and 'healthy'. We are made to feel that if we ask for their help and support with the things we cannot manage, then the price we must pay is to accept only their culture and values and deny ourselves. If people aren't careful they can end up fighting the wrong battle... the battle for support and sympathy and not the battle for equality.

I know what my limitations are. I know what my difficulties are. I feel inferior to other people every single day, but though I feel it, I will not think it and I will not believe it, because I have seen enough of other people to see that nobody is perfect. Even the nicest people I have known have had psychological issues, character flaws, odd behaviours and things they struggle with. I accept that I will have to live with the consequences of being the person that I am all my life, and I might not like what they are, but that goes the same for everybody.

People with Asperger's syndrome deserve to be given the same opportunities as everybody else. We should not have to face extraordinary judgement, scrutiny and criticism that others do not. How can people ever succeed when everyone expects them to fail? How can you be happy when everyone says you should be sad?

I do not deny my difficulties, and I do not disregard those of people less fortunate than myself... I just think that a lot of harm is done when one group of people assumes superiority over another, for whatever reason. The point I am trying to make here is not about whether AS should be treated or cured, or about what help and support people should be entitled to... my objection is to the attitude that sometimes informs people's decisions about these sorts of matters.

The presumption of inferiority insidiously creeps into the language used to describe Asperger's syndrome. Stop. Think.

Cause Treatment Cure Discrimination Bullying Gender Crime Media
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