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asperger's syndrome information and features

         

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Introduction

Lifestyle Survey

Introduction

Most people with Asperger syndrome are semi-independent. In other words, they could survive alone, but to lead a full and healthy life they still need some support. Some are fully independent though, but how many it is hard to say. Statistics only ever look at those who have an official diagnosis, and seen as the many of those who are fully independent do not want or need a diagnosis, they are rarely included in those figures.

Independence is something that most people take for granted, but that doesn't mean it is easy for anybody. Very few people undertake the task entirely upon their own, often relying on a support network of friends and relations or sharing the responsibility with a spouse, partner, or house mate. Perhaps one of the difficulties for people with Asperger syndrome is that we find it so hard to build these support networks and partnerships. If you already find it hard to get organized or if you worry and panic about things, the last thing you need is to be so isolated.

There are different degrees of independence of course, and people vary as to their potential to achieve them. No one can tell you what your potential is, you have to discover it for yourself.

Support and assistance are needed unquestionably, and an understanding of the difficulties and limitations of people with Asperger syndrome is very important too, but I don't think it is helpful to pre-judge peoples potential and to undermine their self confidence and esteem by having dangerously low expectations of them. There is such a thing as self fulfilling prophecy.

The amount of times I've read so called 'caring professionals' telling parents and the general public how the outlook for our lives is 'grim' and how we can't hope to ever hold down a job or have a stable relationship. Presumably they think we can't read as well seen as they have never stopped to consider the impact on us of hearing such a thing. Some of the 'experts' seem to forget we are of normal intelligence. They talk about us as if we have no so self awareness at all.

Also, I am encountering some parents who appear to have been mislead into believing that their small child who has been diagnosed is never going to change. I would like to clear up this misunderstanding. Yes, Asperger's syndrome is lifelong, but Asperger syndrome is not just 'the way they are now'. Your child will still grow up. Problems and difficulties don't go away, but many learn to cope with them or avoid them as the years go by. Some change more than others, but don't think that they can't or won't change at all. An adult with Asperger syndrome is not just a large child with Asperger syndrome... they are an adult. Some get married and have jobs and children. A degree of independent living is not just possible, it is quite achievable.

Lifestyle Survey

If you are diagnosed or strongly consider yourself to have Asperger's Syndrome or a similar autistic spectrum condition, please take a minute to complete the lifestyle survey. Thank you.

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Education Employment Sleep Diet Clothes Family Relationships Independence
Home Diagnosis

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